astronomynerd:

The Rosette Nebula by Tim Stone on Flickr.Via Flickr:
This image is not in true color. Hydrogen is mapped to green, Oxygen to blue, and Sulfur to red. The predominantly cyan color of the image is due the co-location of Hydrogen and Oxygen, which of course are the two components of water. While water is probably not yet abundant in this nebula, it’s clear where it all comes from.
The entire image is about 110 light years in width, a staggering size when you think about it. Light that left a star on the left edge of the image on the day I was born has only made it halfway across the image at this point.
This nebula is somewhere around 5000 light years distant. The light my camera recorded left that object some 500 years before Egypt’s pyramids were built. Virtually all of recorded human history occurred in the time it took that light to arrive at my camera in the winter of 2013. Virtually all of the technology used to capture, process, display, and distribute the image on flickr was invented in the last .6% of its journey.
While it may appear that there are a large number of stars in this nebula, remember that we’re looking through 5000 light years of space to see it. Most of the stars recorded in the image are somewhere between here and there. That said, there are indeed a large number of stars in this nebula, but most of them are visible only in infrared light because they’re still embedded in their cocoons of gas and dust deep inside. Eventually the radiant energy from these newborn stars will dispel the entire nebula, leaving only a sparkling cluster of stars with their solar systems and all the ingredients of life itself.
I’ve reduced the size of this image by 50% from its full resolution of 3720x3444. At that resolution, each pixel spans about .03 light years, so in this version’s full resolution, each pixel spans .06 light years. While that might seem small, Pluto’s orbital diameter is about .0013 light years, so 46 of our solar systems would fit within each pixel. 
You can find more technical information on this image’s Astrobin page.

astronomynerd:

The Rosette Nebula by Tim Stone on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
This image is not in true color. Hydrogen is mapped to green, Oxygen to blue, and Sulfur to red. The predominantly cyan color of the image is due the co-location of Hydrogen and Oxygen, which of course are the two components of water. While water is probably not yet abundant in this nebula, it’s clear where it all comes from.

The entire image is about 110 light years in width, a staggering size when you think about it. Light that left a star on the left edge of the image on the day I was born has only made it halfway across the image at this point.

This nebula is somewhere around 5000 light years distant. The light my camera recorded left that object some 500 years before Egypt’s pyramids were built. Virtually all of recorded human history occurred in the time it took that light to arrive at my camera in the winter of 2013. Virtually all of the technology used to capture, process, display, and distribute the image on flickr was invented in the last .6% of its journey.

While it may appear that there are a large number of stars in this nebula, remember that we’re looking through 5000 light years of space to see it. Most of the stars recorded in the image are somewhere between here and there. That said, there are indeed a large number of stars in this nebula, but most of them are visible only in infrared light because they’re still embedded in their cocoons of gas and dust deep inside. Eventually the radiant energy from these newborn stars will dispel the entire nebula, leaving only a sparkling cluster of stars with their solar systems and all the ingredients of life itself.

I’ve reduced the size of this image by 50% from its full resolution of 3720x3444. At that resolution, each pixel spans about .03 light years, so in this version’s full resolution, each pixel spans .06 light years. While that might seem small, Pluto’s orbital diameter is about .0013 light years, so 46 of our solar systems would fit within each pixel.

You can find more technical information on this image’s Astrobin page.

(via childrenofthisplanet)

childrenofthisplanet:

NASA’s Chandra X-ray telescope has made the first detection of X-ray emission from young solar-type stars that lie outside our Milky Way galaxy. They live in a region known as the “Wing” of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. X-rays from young stars trace how active their magnetic fields are. Magnetic activity provides clues to a star’s rotation rate and the rising and falling of hot gas in the star’s interior. Astronomers suggest that if the X-ray properties of young stars are similar in different environments around our galaxy, then other related properties, such as the formation of planets, are also likely to be similar.
Credit: NASA, ESA, CXC and the University of Potsdam, JPL-Caltech,s and STScI

childrenofthisplanet:

NASA’s Chandra X-ray telescope has made the first detection of X-ray emission from young solar-type stars that lie outside our Milky Way galaxy. They live in a region known as the “Wing” of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. X-rays from young stars trace how active their magnetic fields are. Magnetic activity provides clues to a star’s rotation rate and the rising and falling of hot gas in the star’s interior. Astronomers suggest that if the X-ray properties of young stars are similar in different environments around our galaxy, then other related properties, such as the formation of planets, are also likely to be similar.

Credit: NASA, ESA, CXC and the University of Potsdam, JPL-Caltech,s and STScI

childrenofthisplanet:

Resembling looming rain clouds on a stormy day, dark lanes of dust crisscross the giant elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. Hubble’s panchromatic vision, stretching from ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths, reveals the vibrant glow of young, blue star clusters and a glimpse into regions normally obscured by the dust. This image was taken in July 2010 with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

childrenofthisplanet:

Resembling looming rain clouds on a stormy day, dark lanes of dust crisscross the giant elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. Hubble’s panchromatic vision, stretching from ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths, reveals the vibrant glow of young, blue star clusters and a glimpse into regions normally obscured by the dust. This image was taken in July 2010 with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

mothernaturenetwork:

Stars to look for in autumn’s night skyStars like Vega, Altair and Deneb are still visible in the fall, but constellations like Piscis Austrinus and Aquarius truly shine during the season.

mothernaturenetwork:

Stars to look for in autumn’s night sky
Stars like Vega, Altair and Deneb are still visible in the fall, but constellations like Piscis Austrinus and Aquarius truly shine during the season.

brightestofcentaurus:

NGC 4449
NGC 4449 is an irregular dwarf galaxy located about 12.5 million light years away towards the constellation Canes Venatici, the Hunting Dogs. It is about the size of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, and is currently undergoing a burst of star formation.
Ngc 4449 is also the first dwarf galaxy with a noticable tidal star stream, seen in this image on the lower right. The inset in this image shows the stream in red giant stars. This stream is made from the remains of a smaller galaxy, disrupted by the gravitational forces and now in the process of merging with NGC 4449, probably causing the current starburst. Small galaxies often have large halos of dark matter, so by studying the system astronomers can learn about how the presence of dark matter affects galactic merging.
Image and information from NASA.

brightestofcentaurus:

NGC 4449

NGC 4449 is an irregular dwarf galaxy located about 12.5 million light years away towards the constellation Canes Venatici, the Hunting Dogs. It is about the size of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, and is currently undergoing a burst of star formation.

Ngc 4449 is also the first dwarf galaxy with a noticable tidal star stream, seen in this image on the lower right. The inset in this image shows the stream in red giant stars. This stream is made from the remains of a smaller galaxy, disrupted by the gravitational forces and now in the process of merging with NGC 4449, probably causing the current starburst. Small galaxies often have large halos of dark matter, so by studying the system astronomers can learn about how the presence of dark matter affects galactic merging.

Image and information from NASA.

(via the-actual-universe)